Posts tagged “social media

The World on Your Doorstep

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Larry A. Meltzer, Agency Principal

Recently I interviewed a new grad from one of the public universities in the Dallas area. Of particular interest, this individual told me that the first comm class of every morning started with a current events quiz. The purpose of this exercise is to prompt students to read a physical newspaper every morning, since that’s probably the best way to gain a broad overview of what’s happening in the world – and to score well on the morning quiz!

Some might say this exercise is a relic of times gone by, especially in light of research indicating that half of Americans get their news from Facebook and 10% of Americans think Facebook is actually a news outlet. Anything that gets students – and adults – reading and learning about issues in the world around them is a good thing, but I wonder what we’re losing in terms of knowledge with the decline of print media.

There are advantages to online news consumption, of course:

  • There’s the immediacy factor. When news happens, boom, it’s right there in multimedia, so we read, see and hear about it, not only from news sources, but from those in our social networks.
  • The presentation of news online also offers outlets the ability to incorporate interactive graphics to help explain the story in a way that amplifies – or even replaces – the narrative.
  • There’s the general notion of a news encounter. We’re online, scrolling through our Facebook feeds, and interspersed with a photo of a friend’s lunch are news items that we might not otherwise have scanned.
  • There’s the consumption of news itself. With so few Americans subscribing to news – either in print or online – the availability of information provides access to news that individuals otherwise might not seek out.
  • And of course there’s an environmental benefit, with less paper being used to produce a print product with an extremely short life span.

But what do we lose with the move away from print?

  • We lose the pass-by effect that comes with reading a physical newspaper. We may not read every article, but by flipping through the pages, we’re taking in all the headlines as we evaluate what we want to know more about. So even without reading a story, we’re gaining topline knowledge of key issues or items considered important or relevant enough to put in print.
  • We also lose a depth of information. With all the events occurring around the world, we shortchange ourselves by not delving deep enough into the facts, implications and analyses. The convenience of a snapshot in our Facebook feeds can never compensate for that level of detail.
  • Encountering news – a benefit of online news consumption – also is not the same as following news. Stories and events often play themselves over time, revealing new layers and nuances that help us form opinions.
  • And finally, as the success metrics for media have become more focused on eyeballs and click-throughs, media are presenting stories online with which consumers have the propensity to engage. Sometimes, what consumers want to read, and what they should read, are vastly different.

Knowledge is cumulative. It builds over time through repeated exposure to facts and opinions, and we build our understanding through context and various points of view. A well-written article – whether in print or online – teaches you something. It might present something familiar from an unfamiliar angle.

At the end of the day, I’m not giving up my newspapers, although after the morning read, I’m constantly online, consuming news from these same outlets in their digital counterparts. News outlets deliver the world on your doorstep, so open the door and start reading!


Influencers: Today’s New Celebrities

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By Kara Simon, Assistant Account Executive

I used to sit at the dinner table growing up and listen to my parents talk about celebrities like Audrey Hepburn, Barbara Billingsley and Jim Backus, as if they were their closest friends. These individuals weren’t just stars to my parents, but people who were an integral part of their lives as they grew up to become the adults they are today.

But for me, celebrities are just that­ — celebrities. I am not saying they don’t have an effect on me. I still swoon as Jake Gyllenhaal’s face appears on any movie screen and deny that one time I screamed at an airport when I thought I saw Amy Schumer, but I don’t see them as people who shape my everyday life like my parents and many of those older than me do.  And, I know I am not alone in this thought.

Millennials, like myself, have our own form of celebrities — influencers. I am talking about bloggers, YouTube stars and Instagram sensations. The “Krystal Schlegel’s,” “Jenna Marble’s’” and “Shirley Braha’s” of the world. I wake up to emails from different fashion and food bloggers I subscribe to, scroll through my Instagram feed on my daily walks, and watch too many YouTube videos before falling asleep at night.

Why? Simple. They get me, and millions of others out there, too.

That is the beauty of influencers — there is someone for everyone. Let me say that again. Someone for everyone.

This is key for public relations and marketing professionals. No matter who your client is, or what the campaign entails, an influencer can significantly increase engagement with your brand. You can find an influencer who fits your exact target audience, which helps ensure that your campaign will have a positive return on its investment.

Plus, while influencers typically occupy one main medium, they are active on all. For example, if you are reaching out to a YouTube influencer, they most likely have an Instagram and blog with a large following. This means your message crosses multiple platforms by engaging only one individual.

Another great perk of influencers is that they are located everywhere – unlike celebrities – who are typically concentrated in L.A. or New York. If you are hosting an event and looking to increase attendance, inviting an influencer from your area is a more cost-effective way to attract a good turnout.

The greatest thing about influencers, though, is their price. While big names like Jenna Marble will come at a heftier cost, plenty of local and well-known bloggers come at a very reasonable price, especially when you consider the exposure you are getting in return. According to Inc. Magazine, most influencers range from $25 to $75 CPM, depending on their following.

So, the next time you’re starting a project, big or small, with a blank thought bubble over your head, hop on social media and see who you can find. Whatever you do though, don’t throw your copy of “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” away.

 


For Old Times’ Sake

Larry A. Meltzer, Agency Principal

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To the delight of some and the chagrin of others, TV viewers will soon be treated to reboots of “Twin Peaks,” “Will & Grace” and “Roseanne,” a trio of shows that enjoyed their heydays 20 years or so ago. Yes, nostalgia is back.

And manufacturers and marketers are following suit. From turntables and vinyl records, flip-phones and Oreos with “fireworks” (basically Pop Rocks), companies are tapping into consumers’ craving for the familiar. Why now?

According to research, people lean in to nostalgia when they’re feeling anxious about the present, and about the future. The past is safe, it was familiar, and what we see in the rear-view mirror tends to be rosy, whether that was the reality or not. We fill our rooms with mid-century modern, our pantries with Twinkies, and our tables with deviled eggs.

What are some considerations when tapping into nostalgia?

  • Nostalgia should be an entry point, not an end point. Leveraged correctly, nostalgia is an anchor to the past that grabs attention quickly due to its familiarity, but with a modern overlay. Think the VW New Beetle, introduced in the late ‘90s with a design that drew heavy inspiration from the original Beetle from the earlier part of the century. Think, too, the rebooted TV shows, which presumably will embody a more current take on characters that viewers came to know well during the first incarnation of their respective series.
  • Nostalgia is different for each generation. It’s not a one-size-fits-all approach. For example, the return of the iconic flip phone will likely resonate with Boomers, but for later generations, this might be an entirely new product that they haven’t seen before. Similarly, in our multicultural society, some retro-inspired products will have little meaning beyond the traditional core group to which they were initially marketed.
  • Nostalgia plays well on social media. While the overall notion of nostalgia correlates to traditional media, some brands are melding old and new media to strengthen consumer engagement. With the popular #TBT (Throwback Thursday) hashtag, auto makers Dodge and BMW have had success attracting eyeballs with photos of classic cars from their lineups through the decades.
  • Nostalgia won’t save a brand. Remember Radio Shack’s 2014 Super Bowl ad featuring pop culture icons from the 1980s? It was lauded as one of the best ads that year, but where is Radio Shack now? More recently, the 1990s hit Pokemon made a resurgence by adding augmented reality and creating Pokemon GO!, which burst onto today’s pop culture scene. But it’s rapid rise was matched by an equally rapid decline.

Like all good programs, a campaign rooted in nostalgia needs to be timely and relevant in order to be effective. So while the future of marketing might not be tethered to the past, a well-timed and carefully executed stroll down memory lane might bring a smile to consumers’ faces and stronger engagement to your brand. (But please, let’s leave parachute pants in the past!)

 


Let It Rain on My Parade

Larry A. Meltzer, Agency Principal

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Many marketers will say that digital is the new traditional.

There’s no arguing with the ability to deploy dollars in a more targeted way through digital channels, but some creative ideas can only come to life – and achieve maximum effectiveness – in the physical world.  The “tequila cloud” promoting travel to Mexico is one of those ideas that demonstrates the value of marketing in the physical world.

The goal of this German-based campaign was to promote travel to Mexico as a vacation destination. As part of a special exhibit in Berlin during the rainiest month of the year, whenever it rained in the city – which the ad agency said was frequently during the time of the exhibit – the tequila cloud also produced “rain” in the form of tequila raindrops. You can read more about how this was achieved here.

Could this same concept be produced in a digital environment? Sure, but the impact of watching a tequila cloud on a smartphone or small screen would likely have resulted in a ho-hum response, rather than an experience that prompts word-of-mouth pass-along. There is also some wisdom for marketers that rained from the tequila cloud. To wit, consider these three takeaways:

  • Experiences connect consumers to a brand. When you execute an idea that can stop people in their tracks, you really have an opportunity to connect a consumer to the brand. This type of experience defines and strengthens a brand in a way that online engagement can’t, because it has staying power in the real world.
  • Physical marketing lets you gauge emotions and reactions in real-time. While much of marketing is rooted in research and metrics, gut instinct based on experience still plays a role. When you can watch and gauge consumer reaction on the spot, you can dial up or down certain aspects to take advantage of consumer response.
  • Strong engagement gives you permission to grow a program. When you can see that consumers are engaged with your brand in the physical world, why not expand the concept further into the physical world, and into the digital world as well? This is where the blurring of traditional and digital proves that synergies do exist, and expansion of an engaging program delivers a longer shelf life and greater exposure.

When you’re brainstorming ideas for your next campaign, your head may be in the clouds, but sometimes it makes sense to have a campaign that’s rooted in the physical world.


All Agencies, Big and Small

Larry A. Meltzer, Agency Principal

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It’s the time of year when the agency holding companies officially put the previous financial year to bed, and the industry media compile their annual agency rankings. As a long-time veteran of the agency business, what strikes me every year is the way the descriptions of agencies have changed over the years – and this is true for both large and small agencies.

A scroll through the rankings – or indeed, an agency’s website – reveals prominent mentions of size (in terms of billings) and awards, as if size and awards are the best indicator of quality or fit for a client. What happened to pride of work? I suspect much of this is driven by the holding company model – holding companies, after all, are about maximizing the value of their portfolio of companies.

My own career has taken me through the doorways and hallways of agencies of all sizes, from largest-in-the-world and on down to the boutique agency that I now lead. If I had to distill down what I’ve learned about the pros and cons of big and small, I’d point to these five truths:

  • There’s a place for big, and there’s a sweet spot for small.  Big agencies do a great job with big clients. They’re structured to serve the broad needs of the multinationals that aren’t particularly price sensitive. But as the big agencies have grown bigger, and their cost structures size them out of certain assignments, there has been a clearer bifurcation of the market, delineating a real sweet spot for small agencies – not just in terms of company size or budget, but in terms of the type of senior-level talent and attention that really lives the client’s business in a way that a big agency can’t match.
  • To get to the soul of an agency, ask them to describe it.  Big agencies are proud of their size, and that tends to be the fallback description, along with awards. But most clients with whom I’ve worked over the years are more interested in what we’ve done for them, rather than the accolades we’ve received or the billings we’ve racked up. Small agencies, however, because they can’t fall back on size, tend to describe the work they do, and the results they’ve delivered for clients.
  • Big agencies are like accounting firms; small agencies are like investment firms. Every business need to generate a certain return to exist, but the big agencies for which I’ve worked have been like accounting firms, driven by the numbers rather than by delivering good work. Small agencies, on the other hand, are like investment firms, with the investment in this case being the clients and the people. Since there’s more at stake in a client relationship for a small agency, they tend to over-index on client service and the focus on results.
  • Big agencies give you access to talent; small agencies give you a talented team. True, big agencies have a deeper bench of talent across the network, which, of course, comes with a cost. Clients can tap into and out of this talent based on need. Small agencies, on the other hand, provide access to a talented team on a full-time basis. There can be a greater personal and professional integration between agency and client teams, with both focused on delivering great results.
  • Big agencies will sell you what they have; small agencies will sell you what you need. It stands to reason: If you have a lemonade stand, you’ll sell lemonade. In the same way, big agency employees are trained to sell what the agency offers, sometimes trying to fit the proverbial square peg in the round hole. They want to keep the revenue within their four walls. Small agencies, however, typically take a best-of-breed approach, and assemble the resources appropriate to the client need, agnostic of the source.

It’s a big world filled with big and small agencies and big and small clients. At the end of the day, an agency is best judged not by its size, but by the size of its ideas and the size of the results it can deliver for clients.


Good P.R.? Spread It Around!

 

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Larry A. Meltzer, Agency Principal

If you’re not fortunate enough to live in a market served by In-N-Out Burger, you’re missing out on not only some of the best fast food around, but also a front seat to some of the most fervent and loyal customers of any brand. In the past few weeks alone, the chain has been in the news for the positive relationship that grandparents built with their granddaughter through weekly photos at the restaurant, and for a California couple who held their wedding reception at an In-N-Out location. After all, nothing sets a couple on the road to wedded bliss like a double-double and animal fries!

You can’t buy p.r. like this. But can you foster it? Yes, but it requires that a brand be quick on the uptake, and also display a deft touch. Looking at brands that do this right, we see a few commonalities:

  • Embrace it. It’s great to celebrate when this type of user-generated content goes viral, but go beyond – participate in it. Embed it on your brand’s website for a period. Engage with the participants to bolster the good feelings, and find a way to enlist them as brand ambassadors.
  • Sread it around. While a brand doesn’t want to appear as if it’s taking over the user-generated content, you can make sure your influencers – both external and internal – know about it. Encourage them to share it with their networks as a way to spread the message organically.
  • Build on it. What else can you do to put a halo around your brand while interest is heightened? Create a hashtag around it as way to invite others to participate in the fun. In the case of the wedding, create a “wedding package” so others can follow in the bride-and-groom’s footsteps, or hold a contest to find other newlyweds looking for an unusual reception venue.

As marketers, we tend to lean in where we have control. But if you loosen the reins a bit when others control the message, in a positive way that engages a broader audience, the results can be a viral ride that reflects well on your brand.

Disclaimer:  Our firm has done work with In-N-Out Burger.

 


A Few Words to End the Week

 

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Larry A. Meltzer, Agency Principal

The current issue of Fortune includes a terrific book excerpt that describes the art and science that leads an individual to breakthrough ideas. From personal experience, I’ve always valued the structured brainstorm or ideation session in which group-think builds and shapes ideas. But I don’t think I’ve ever left one of those sessions knowing that we’ve hit on the creative answer that we were seeking. Inevitably that comes later, and it comes through the process described in this new book, “The Net and the Butterfly: The Art and Practice of Breakthrough Thinking.”

In brief, the book describes how you can get in your “genius mode,” and – not surprisingly to me – “one way is to sleep on it.” Throughout my career, I’ve found that some “alone time” – before or after a group brainstorm – is where the ideas really start to come together. Another piece of advice from the book when you’re facing a creative challenge? Take a walk. These activities or periods of time give your brain the space to focus, and to wander, letting your mind make connections among the knowledge you’ve built up over the years.

A few other bits that I’ve learned over the years:

  • Time isn’t just a luxury. Our industry is fast-paced, and carving out time to think shouldn’t be something that we think of as a luxury. Taking a walk isn’t necessarily idle time. It’s time to step away from whatever is on your desk – or whatever is distracting you on your phone – and letting your mind do its best work.
  • Read, read, read. I’ve counseled junior staff to follow their clients’ industries, as well as their own industries, whether in print, on air, or online. Great ideas happen when we connect what seem like disparate thoughts or pieces or information. So fill your mind with all sorts of information – whatever takes your fancy. At some point, all that knowledge will be used to make connections that lead to a collection of ideas, or even to that single breakthrough idea.
  • Don’t lose the idea! As the ideas percolate in your head – especially in that down time before you fall asleep – it’s easy to convince yourself that you’ll remember them in the morning. I’ve thought the same thing, only to wake up in the morning and ask myself, “What was that killer idea I had last night?!” Now I keep a pad and pen by my bedside. I’ve also called and left myself a voicemail when I’ve been out on a jog, or sent myself an email to make sure I have some notes on my thinking.

Now, how was I going to end this piece? I know I had a great idea … Oh yeah – when your day is done, sleep on some of these ideas.