Posts tagged “newspaper

Modern Love with the PR Industry

Kara Simon, Assistant Account Executive

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My latest obsession has been The New York Times’ “Modern Love” column and podcast. I know, I know – I am late to the game, but…

IT. IS. AWESOME.

Not only are the stories told narrated by some of my favorite celebrities, but the writing styles, narratives and key messaging are the best, bar none. I am not just saying this because I majored in journalism, or because I idolize the all-knowing publication that is The New York Times. I am saying this because it is one of the best examples of storytelling today.

In the PR industry, it is our job to tell stories. A lot of the time they are happy, positive stories about industry successes and leaders making a difference. Other times, they are hard-hitting, pulse-rising breaking stories that you never see coming. Regardless of news’ tone, if we don’t turn it into a story, then it’s just another piece of news cluttering people’s inboxes or smart devices ready to be deleted.

So what goes into the making of a good story?

First, it is important to establish your characters. In our case, these are the individuals involved. What is their title? What is their position on the topic? Most importantly though, what makes them different from every other leader in the industry? The “Modern Love” column almost always establishes the character with a background story that makes them unique. It may not be completely relevant to the story at hand, but it is designed to make the character relatable, so the reader can place themselves in the shoes of that character and be more willing to accept the story. The same should be done in PR, so that a C-level executive can be seen as someone who an “Average Joe” would want to get to know.

Secondly, the plot. What is TRULY happening? Nobody, and I mean nobody, cares about all of the tiny intricacies of an event… So get to the point. For example, the best love stories are the ones that start with the two people who fall in love interacting from the beginning. The same goes for the best PR stories. They start with the headline upfront, and then gradually give way to supporting details.

Finally, the ending. The best endings are not endings at all. In fact, they leave the reader with a “But, what’s next?” thought bubble over their head. It is how you get them to think about your story long after their eyes depart from the screen the story was on. It is how you get them to wake up the next morning still thinking about your story, and begin looking for follow-up stories that may have come out the next day. The majority of the “Modern Love” stories do this as well. The last sentence leaves you with a lingering thought that draws your mouse downward and into the next love story. So, make your ending linger for as long as you want it to be remembered.

If there is one thing to take away from this article, PR professional or not, it is that stories have a way of impacting people. So, what is yours?

 


The World on Your Doorstep

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Larry A. Meltzer, Agency Principal

Recently I interviewed a new grad from one of the public universities in the Dallas area. Of particular interest, this individual told me that the first comm class of every morning started with a current events quiz. The purpose of this exercise is to prompt students to read a physical newspaper every morning, since that’s probably the best way to gain a broad overview of what’s happening in the world – and to score well on the morning quiz!

Some might say this exercise is a relic of times gone by, especially in light of research indicating that half of Americans get their news from Facebook and 10% of Americans think Facebook is actually a news outlet. Anything that gets students – and adults – reading and learning about issues in the world around them is a good thing, but I wonder what we’re losing in terms of knowledge with the decline of print media.

There are advantages to online news consumption, of course:

  • There’s the immediacy factor. When news happens, boom, it’s right there in multimedia, so we read, see and hear about it, not only from news sources, but from those in our social networks.
  • The presentation of news online also offers outlets the ability to incorporate interactive graphics to help explain the story in a way that amplifies – or even replaces – the narrative.
  • There’s the general notion of a news encounter. We’re online, scrolling through our Facebook feeds, and interspersed with a photo of a friend’s lunch are news items that we might not otherwise have scanned.
  • There’s the consumption of news itself. With so few Americans subscribing to news – either in print or online – the availability of information provides access to news that individuals otherwise might not seek out.
  • And of course there’s an environmental benefit, with less paper being used to produce a print product with an extremely short life span.

But what do we lose with the move away from print?

  • We lose the pass-by effect that comes with reading a physical newspaper. We may not read every article, but by flipping through the pages, we’re taking in all the headlines as we evaluate what we want to know more about. So even without reading a story, we’re gaining topline knowledge of key issues or items considered important or relevant enough to put in print.
  • We also lose a depth of information. With all the events occurring around the world, we shortchange ourselves by not delving deep enough into the facts, implications and analyses. The convenience of a snapshot in our Facebook feeds can never compensate for that level of detail.
  • Encountering news – a benefit of online news consumption – also is not the same as following news. Stories and events often play themselves over time, revealing new layers and nuances that help us form opinions.
  • And finally, as the success metrics for media have become more focused on eyeballs and click-throughs, media are presenting stories online with which consumers have the propensity to engage. Sometimes, what consumers want to read, and what they should read, are vastly different.

Knowledge is cumulative. It builds over time through repeated exposure to facts and opinions, and we build our understanding through context and various points of view. A well-written article – whether in print or online – teaches you something. It might present something familiar from an unfamiliar angle.

At the end of the day, I’m not giving up my newspapers, although after the morning read, I’m constantly online, consuming news from these same outlets in their digital counterparts. News outlets deliver the world on your doorstep, so open the door and start reading!


The Wisdom on the Street

Larry Meltzer, Agency Principal/Creative Director of MM2 Public Relations

I can’t help wondering if a possible solution to stop the decline of newspapers has been under our feet all this time.

Consider this microcosm of the newspaper world.  Every morning, residents on my street are greeted with colored plastic bags, each holding a different newspaper:  white for the major daily, blue for the New York Times, pink for the Wall Street Journal, and – once a week – clear for the weekly community paper.

The white bag used to rule, sitting on the sidewalk in front of nearly every house.  Today, white, blue and pink bags are scattered around with no real majority, but the clear bag – fully paid subscriptions only, no comps – is a uniform sight up and down the street, week after week.

My informal focus group of neighbors reveals why:  People want the news that affects them – school happenings, new retailers, town issues and the like.  They’re perfectly happy to get the national and world news on the fly, wherever they find it, whether in print, broadcast or online.

Maybe those colored plastic bags need to take a look at each other and think about how to take back their turf, on the sidewalk and on the newsstands, so to speak.  Is the answer in the European model, where a few national newspapers prosper happily alongside local dailies that are truly local?

After all, news is more relevant when it’s more personal, which is why those hyper-local web sites seem to be attracting eyeballs.  Perhaps the major dailies should consider doing what they’re staffed to do best – becoming the go-to source for everything local – while leaving the world reporting to the national papers staffed to do that best.