Kara Simon

Modern Love with the PR Industry

Kara Simon, Assistant Account Executive

Blog Photo 07 21 17

My latest obsession has been The New York Times’ “Modern Love” column and podcast. I know, I know – I am late to the game, but…

IT. IS. AWESOME.

Not only are the stories told narrated by some of my favorite celebrities, but the writing styles, narratives and key messaging are the best, bar none. I am not just saying this because I majored in journalism, or because I idolize the all-knowing publication that is The New York Times. I am saying this because it is one of the best examples of storytelling today.

In the PR industry, it is our job to tell stories. A lot of the time they are happy, positive stories about industry successes and leaders making a difference. Other times, they are hard-hitting, pulse-rising breaking stories that you never see coming. Regardless of news’ tone, if we don’t turn it into a story, then it’s just another piece of news cluttering people’s inboxes or smart devices ready to be deleted.

So what goes into the making of a good story?

First, it is important to establish your characters. In our case, these are the individuals involved. What is their title? What is their position on the topic? Most importantly though, what makes them different from every other leader in the industry? The “Modern Love” column almost always establishes the character with a background story that makes them unique. It may not be completely relevant to the story at hand, but it is designed to make the character relatable, so the reader can place themselves in the shoes of that character and be more willing to accept the story. The same should be done in PR, so that a C-level executive can be seen as someone who an “Average Joe” would want to get to know.

Secondly, the plot. What is TRULY happening? Nobody, and I mean nobody, cares about all of the tiny intricacies of an event… So get to the point. For example, the best love stories are the ones that start with the two people who fall in love interacting from the beginning. The same goes for the best PR stories. They start with the headline upfront, and then gradually give way to supporting details.

Finally, the ending. The best endings are not endings at all. In fact, they leave the reader with a “But, what’s next?” thought bubble over their head. It is how you get them to think about your story long after their eyes depart from the screen the story was on. It is how you get them to wake up the next morning still thinking about your story, and begin looking for follow-up stories that may have come out the next day. The majority of the “Modern Love” stories do this as well. The last sentence leaves you with a lingering thought that draws your mouse downward and into the next love story. So, make your ending linger for as long as you want it to be remembered.

If there is one thing to take away from this article, PR professional or not, it is that stories have a way of impacting people. So, what is yours?

 


Influencers: Today’s New Celebrities

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By Kara Simon, Assistant Account Executive

I used to sit at the dinner table growing up and listen to my parents talk about celebrities like Audrey Hepburn, Barbara Billingsley and Jim Backus, as if they were their closest friends. These individuals weren’t just stars to my parents, but people who were an integral part of their lives as they grew up to become the adults they are today.

But for me, celebrities are just that­ — celebrities. I am not saying they don’t have an effect on me. I still swoon as Jake Gyllenhaal’s face appears on any movie screen and deny that one time I screamed at an airport when I thought I saw Amy Schumer, but I don’t see them as people who shape my everyday life like my parents and many of those older than me do.  And, I know I am not alone in this thought.

Millennials, like myself, have our own form of celebrities — influencers. I am talking about bloggers, YouTube stars and Instagram sensations. The “Krystal Schlegel’s,” “Jenna Marble’s’” and “Shirley Braha’s” of the world. I wake up to emails from different fashion and food bloggers I subscribe to, scroll through my Instagram feed on my daily walks, and watch too many YouTube videos before falling asleep at night.

Why? Simple. They get me, and millions of others out there, too.

That is the beauty of influencers — there is someone for everyone. Let me say that again. Someone for everyone.

This is key for public relations and marketing professionals. No matter who your client is, or what the campaign entails, an influencer can significantly increase engagement with your brand. You can find an influencer who fits your exact target audience, which helps ensure that your campaign will have a positive return on its investment.

Plus, while influencers typically occupy one main medium, they are active on all. For example, if you are reaching out to a YouTube influencer, they most likely have an Instagram and blog with a large following. This means your message crosses multiple platforms by engaging only one individual.

Another great perk of influencers is that they are located everywhere – unlike celebrities – who are typically concentrated in L.A. or New York. If you are hosting an event and looking to increase attendance, inviting an influencer from your area is a more cost-effective way to attract a good turnout.

The greatest thing about influencers, though, is their price. While big names like Jenna Marble will come at a heftier cost, plenty of local and well-known bloggers come at a very reasonable price, especially when you consider the exposure you are getting in return. According to Inc. Magazine, most influencers range from $25 to $75 CPM, depending on their following.

So, the next time you’re starting a project, big or small, with a blank thought bubble over your head, hop on social media and see who you can find. Whatever you do though, don’t throw your copy of “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” away.